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Pathway for sustainable development of seaweed farming in Scotland

A new report commissioned by Crown Estate Scotland has highlighted a potential pathway for the sustainable growth of Scottish seaweed farming over the coming years. The Economic Feasibility Study contains a number of conclusions and recommendations that can help develop the sector in Scotland.

Seaweed farming holds huge potential for Scotland’s coastal communities, and has already seen significant growth on a global scale. This report clearly shows that there are real opportunities for the expansion of the sector in Scotland, and that this can bring economic benefits to coastal communities in a number of different ways.

The key recommendations contained in the report include:

  • Greater collaboration across the supply chain and pooling of knowledge and services to provide capability and scale.
  • Better guidance on economic considerations of setting up seaweed farms

 

The research was commissioned by Crown Estate Scotland, the public body responsible for managing about half the foreshore around Scotland’s coast, and was carried out by Enscape Consulting in collaboration with SAMS Research Services and Imani Development.

Alex Adrian, Head of Aquaculture for Crown Estate Scotland, said: “This important research can act as a potential roadmap for how a sustainable and successful seaweed farming industry in Scotland could develop. We have a fantastic natural resource available to us, but we have to ensure that this is done in a way which protects both our coastal environment and our communities.”

Crown Estate Scotland is very clear that any expansion of the seaweed farming sector in Scotland only take place in line with the strictest possible environmental protections, and with sustainability at its centre.

Crown Estate Scotland also plays an active role in the work of the Scottish Government’s Seaweed Review Group.

The full report can be found here.